Deciphering Culture

Archive for the ‘Creativity’ Category

Redesigning the world (“Healing or Stealing” by Paul Hawken)

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I must admit I’m a sucker for a great speech and Paul Hawken gave one last year as the commencement speaker at Portland University about what “it means to be a human being on earth at a time when every living system is declining, and the rate of decline is accelerating.” A few excerpts below and a link to the full text.

This planet came with a set of instructions, but we seem to have misplaced them. Important rules like don’t poison the water, soil, or air, don’t let the earth get overcrowded, and don’t touch the thermostat have been broken. Buckminster Fuller said that spaceship earth was so ingeniously designed that no one has a clue that we are on one, flying through the universe at a million miles per hour, with no need for seatbelts, lots of room in coach, and really good food—but all that is changing.

There is invisible writing on the back of the diploma you will receive, and in case you didn’t bring lemon juice to decode it, I can tell you what it says: You are Brilliant, and the Earth is Hiring. The earth couldn’t afford to send recruiters or limos to your school. It sent you rain, sunsets, ripe cherries, night blooming jasmine, and that unbelievably cute person you are dating. Take the hint. And here’s the deal: Forget that this task of planet-saving is not possible in the time required. Don’t be put off by people who know what is not possible. Do what needs to be done, and check to see if it was impossible only after you are done.

The living world is not “out there” somewhere, but in your heart. What do we know about life? In the words of biologist Janine Benyus, life creates the conditions that are conducive to life. I can think of no better motto for a future economy. We have tens of thousands of abandoned homes without people and tens of thousands of abandoned people without homes. We have failed bankers advising failed regulators on how to save failed assets. We are the only species on the planet without full employment. Brilliant. We have an economy that tells us that it is cheaper to destroy earth in real time rather than renew, restore, and sustain it. You can print money to bail out a bank but you can’t print life to bail out a planet. At present we are stealing the future, selling it in the present, and calling it gross domestic product. We can just as easily have an economy that is based on healing the future instead of stealing it. We can either create assets for the future or take the assets of the future. One is called restoration and the other exploitation. And whenever we exploit the earth we exploit people and cause untold suffering. Working for the earth is not a way to get rich, it is a way to be rich.

2009 Commencement Speech by Paul Hawkin (at Portland University): Healing or Stealing?

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Written by Jeffrey Callen

July 29, 2010 at 11:19 am

Music Industry Reading List from Dave Haynes of SoundCloud

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An installment of the series of summer music industry readings lists being published by Hypebot (for me essential music biz reading). This list if from Dave Haynes of SoundCloud.

Dave Haynes’s Summer Reading List (for the entire text). Below is an abbreviated version with my added keywords before each one:

(1) virtual reality, creativity, web 2.0

You Are Not a Gadget by Jaron Lanier – … best known as a pioneer of virtual reality, (Lanier) argues against many of the web 2.0 theories and … makes the case that these trends could stifle creativity, individualism and expression in the human race.

(2) art, creativity, self-expression, success

Linchpin by Seth Godin – Linchpin… argues that we must become indispensable, setting about our ‘true art’ rather than being content with being just another cog in the wheel. And that in today’s environment that’s not just desirable but actually vital, if we’re to succeed.

(3) web 2.0, technology, gin, sit-coms, creativity, media, social network

Cognitive Surplus by Clay Shirky – argues that the critical technology that got everyone through the early phase of the Industrial Revolution was actually gin! People had to drink themselves into a stupor just to get through it. In the Post-Industrial Age the gin-equivalent has been the sitcom. The compelling argument here is that times are now changing. We’re no longer happy to sit back and simply consume. A new generation has started to watch less and less TV and use this spare time, this cognitive surplus, to participate and create. Whether it’s posting to Wikipedia, leaving comments on blogs, uploading videos to Youtube or creating lolcats, the fact is that things are getting more participatory and it’s easy to create and publish. Media is no longer a one-way street.

(4) inspiration

What Matters Now by Seth Godin – Godin… has compiled a really inspiring e-book with wise words from all manner of different people on ‘What Matters Now’. Contributions come from the likes of Fred Wilson, Joi Ito, Kevin Kelly, Hugh MacLeod, Chris Anderson, Tim O’Reilly, Gary Vaynercuk, Jason Fried etc. It’s a very simple idea, get a bunch of smart people, ask them to write one short page on what they thing matters now, compile it into an e-book, then ask people to go and share it for free.

(5) fiction, music industry

Kill Your Friends: A Novel by John Niven – an extremely dark tale set in the late 90’s, at the height of Britpop, about an A&R guy working at a major label. It’s loosely based on the author’s own experience of working in the music biz and a murderous plotline is wrapped around tales of ridiculous A&R meetings, demands from artists and trips to music conferences such as SXSW and Midem.

Written by Jeffrey Callen

July 22, 2010 at 12:13 pm

“KEYS FOR INNOVATION: FORCE IDEAS, BE CREATIVE AND FEEL GOOD AT WORK”

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Reposting a reposting from OWNI of a great, short article on the sine qua non for fostering creative work by Mathilde Berchon on L’Atelier. The bottom line lessson: “what makes innovative ideas happen is mainly interaction and personal development.”

Keys for Innovation: Force Ideas, Be Creative and Feel Good at Work

The best companies leverage their  employees’ creativity and capacity to generate development strategies. Google, Pixar, Ideo: three California giants that strongly encourage and listen to the ideas that come from the trenches. And technology plays a large role in that process.

As Jeff Lawson, CEO of Twilio, explained at the last TEDxSoMa conference: “Don’t wait for the big idea!” Process, workshops and analysis grids help to find new and consistent ideas. His 3-step program (1. brainstorm, 2. map/reduce, 3. matrix) is an efficient way to generate a lot of ideas and determine better ones.

Jonathan Mann, musician and troubadour who writes a song a day – a fresh and funny look at technology (listen to “Cloud Computing for Beginners” or “Bing goes the Internet“) – since January 1st, 2009, shares this point of view: inspiration is rare, even for the most creative people. You have to force it to make ideas happen.

Mindmapping tools, to-do lists and note-sharing utilities like Evernote are useful but what makes innovative ideas happen is mainly interaction and personal development. (To read the rest, click here…)

Written by Jeffrey Callen

June 30, 2010 at 10:59 am

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